Activity 4: How to Deliver Feedback


#1

Activities

  1. Read the articles under the “Readings” in Module 4
  2. Take a look at the Course in a Box section on “Feedback” specifically the “Concepts” “Projects and Resources”
  3. Drawing from what you’ve learned about the “Critical Response Process” draft five-to-six “Neutral” questions about the Feedback section to help improve it.
  4. Post your feedback below by Friday, November 7.

#2

Okay, after reading the readings, I’ve got a few questions here:

  • Do you want to know about two typos I found?
  • In what other ways, besides the way you did, can you describe or explain the principles of solid feedback on the web that you embrace?
  • When you say “the research suggests” what kind of research is this? Where is it coming from and who is conducting it?
  • What can often stand in the way of building reflection into courses, and what can help it get built in?

#3

Hey @Tyler! If you want to take screenshots and mark them up, that would be great!

Are the principles too wordy?

When you’ve seen reflection built into courses and you like it, what does that look like?

Thank you!


#4

Okay marked up to show what exactly? And what is a good way/vehicle to mark them up?

I think the principles are just the right level of concise, actually. I was wondering if it might be useful to have them listed at first together and then explained individually, but I also don’t think that was truly a neutral question because I was trying to get a point across and actually should have just told it to you.

Reflection that I like that has been built into courses is usually a conversation (in-person, or at least synchronous chat through video or text) at the end of major assignments/benchmarks. It is most comfortably and easiest for me if the only thing I have to do is bring things up (i.e., not record things or be responsible for recording them in some way)


#5

What’s the mail reasons for the CRP?
Why is reflection so important?
Why do we need learning systems?
What makes a good learning system?
What are some strong assets of our learning system here with Writing for Change?


#6

Nice @Danyelle_J_Delves. I think your neutral questions were a lot closer to the ideal than mine were :smile:


#7

I think the main reason for CPR is important because it makes you think in a different direction then you was before and hopefully it makes you better. You don’t have to be nice to give feedback, but I think you should know your audience and pay attention to others body language when giving feedback. CPR is how the world is run, is how schools are ran, is test, quizzes and essays. You have to be open minded in order to understand how CPR is meant to work and hopefully it makes you better than before.


#8

Accepting critical feedback is a difficult process. However, if you keep an open mind and are curious how others view your work, you will not only be a better person, you will be more successful. This is why reflection is so important. It forces you to look at your work or project from different points of view. This information could be instrumental to your work.

I love Danyelle’s questions came up with!


#9

In what ways has your project strengthened from peer feedback?

How do you feel metacognition effects the confidence level of the learner?

What are some examples of an expert guest on P2P?

In reference to the introduction of “Play With Your Music,” how much feedback did the reflective process, or listing their steps receive? Were there any creative suggestions that helped bring a project to the next level or create a collaboration?

Were there any subtopics listed in the “Get Feedback” course that seemed more successful than others? If you had to pick one as your biggest motivator, what would it be?


#10

In what ways has your project strengthened from peer feedback?

I Feel the feed back I got was healthy and encouraging for me to hear. I can’t wait to start a new year in the yard. I will be documenting each and every step of the way!

How do you feel metacognition effects the confidence level of the learner?
Metacognition is something you have to first be aware of in yourself. Many people aren’t aware that they can think for themselves . That what they personally think can be different from the thought process of others. This is where that whole think outside the box thing comes from. Once you realize what’s happening around you and that you can express your own opinions then, you will begin developing the confidence in your own abilities as an effective learner to make things happen. It’s like when the light comes on up stairs. That aw ha moment. You begin to grow as a person.

What are some examples of an expert guest on P2P?
Someone who knows a lot about something and visits to share ideas.

In reference to the introduction of “Play With Your Music,” how much feedback did the reflective process, or listing their steps receive? Were there any creative suggestions that helped bring a project to the next level or create a collaboration?

Were there any subtopics listed in the “Get Feedback” course that seemed more successful than others? If you had to pick one as your biggest motivator, what would it be?


#11

I want to finish this. Checking on some other modules for a better understanding of the questions.


#12

AWESOME questions @Rachael, especially the simple and spot-on…

I have no doubt @vanessa will be able to use some of these to improve the feedback section.


#13

Sure thing, @Gina, thanks for the update. Great questions already.


#14

@Tyler if you’re feeling techy, you could edit the file directly :slight_smile:

https://github.com/p2pu/course-in-a-box/blob/gh-pages/modules/feedback/_posts/2000-01-01-concepts.markdown


#15

Hey @gina thanks for the thoughtful questions.

How do you think about expertise? Do you consider yourself to be a P2PU expert now? :slight_smile:


#16

Wow that’s cool! Thanks for pulling back the curtain even more, but I can’t seem to find the one or two that I had vaguely written down! I think someone must have gotten to them.